Home News

dentii | News

Non-inflammatory destructive periodontal disease

Print PDF

NIDPD case was studied in order to analyze features of the disease, and discuss the possible etiologic factors.

Although, bacteria are a critical etiologic factor that are needed to develop periodontal disease, bacteria alone are insufficient to induce periodontal disease. A susceptible host is also required, and the host's susceptibility as local and/or general predisposing risk factors, are important determinants of the disease status.

An accurate diagnosis is often essential in developing a predictable and suitable treatment plan, which, when executed, gives a guide to the resolution of the periodontal disease's activity. The majority of all forms of periodontal diseases, are considered as microorganism-induced diseases, which promote an inflammatory host defense response against the bacteria and noxious materials from bacterial plaque.

The inflammatory process inactivates bacteria, but produces the liberation of bacterial and neutrophil derived products such as enzymes, which induce periodontal tissue destruction by lytic activities. Therefore, the characteristics of the most common periodontal disease are: presence of gingival inflammation, ulceration of the junctional epithelium, loss of connective tissue and alveolar bone, causing apical migration of the junctional epithelium and development of periodontal pockets.

However, not all types of periodontal disease seem to be caused by periodontopathogenic bacteria, and not all are distinguished by an evident inflammatory process, and periodontal tissue destruction associated with periodontal periodontal pocket formation and progressive deepening. Non inflammatory destructive periodontal disease (NIDPD), is a severe destructive periodontal disease, which is characterized by periodontal attachment loss, alveolar bone loss, generalized gingival recession without pathognomonic sign of inflammation, and periodontal pocket development. Conventional periodontal therapy and antimicrobial therapy are ineffective, in preventing further progression of the disease. A NIDPD case was studied in order to analyse features of the disease, and discuss the possible etiologic factors as an association of endogenous opportunist bacteria with anatomical aspects, occlusion pattern, emotional stress and mouth breathing condition.

Thank you for supporting Medical News Today
 

Researchers analyze potentially hazardous dental drill debris under composite fillings

Print PDF

While dental drills, or burs, are used extensively in dentistry to mechanically prepare tooth structures for fillings, little is known about the bur debris left behind in the teeth and whether it poses potential health risks to patients.

Imaging analyses have revealed dental bur fragments of different sizes in different locations on the floor of the prepared surface of the teeth and under the filling, which places them in direct contact with the tubules and fluid within dentin. The fragments are made of tungsten carbide-cobalt, which is bio-incompatible.

"Further studies need to investigate if or to what extent the small amount of bio-incompatible debris constitutes a biohazard to patients," said Dr. Assem Hedayat, lead author of the Journal of Synchrotron Radiation article.

 

Dentistry Pediatrics / Children's Health Tooth decay among 5 year olds in England continues significant decline

Print PDF

The number of 5 year olds with tooth decay has dropped to its lowest level in almost a decade, according to a PHE oral health survey.

The oral health survey published by Public Health England (PHE) reveals that less than 25% of the cohort suffers from tooth decay, a 20% drop since 2008.

This continues the downward trend seen since 2008, in the first oral health survey of 5 year olds asking parents to opt-in. In 2008, 31% of 5 year olds suffered tooth decay; in 2012 it was 27%. The pattern of dental health improvement among the age group shows the impact parents and carers can have in establishing good dental care habits from an early age.

Dr Sandra White, Director of Dental Public Health at PHE, said:

This is great news. However, one child with tooth decay is one too many and there is still much inequality in dental health around the country. Tooth decay is painful and too often results in teeth extraction, some under general anaesthetic.

This is further evidence that we can stop tooth decay in its tracks. Limiting sugary food and drink, supporting children to brush their teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and regular trips to the dentist, will help prevent a great many more children suffering at the hands of tooth decay.

According to the survey an estimated 166,467 5 year olds suffer from tooth decay, compared with 177,423 in 2008.

While there has been a significant decline in tooth decay at a national level, there is still a great deal of regional variation. In the North West, a third (33.4%) of 5 year olds suffer from tooth decay, whereas only a fifth (20.1%) do in the in the South East. As with the 2 previous surveys, areas with higher levels of deprivation tend to have higher levels of tooth decay.

The proportion of 5 year olds who have had teeth removed due to decay was 2.5%, compared to 3.5% in 2008 - about 2,000 fewer children. Regional variation shows that only 1.9% of 5 year olds in the East Midlands have had tooth extractions due to decay, compared with 3.9% of children in Yorkshire and the Humber.

The survey also shows the average number of teeth affected by decay per child was 0.8, down from 1.1 in 2008. For the first time, data has also been collected across the survey on ethnicity and dental health.

The last 3 surveys have shown the dental health of 5 year olds is improving. There has been a 9% increase in the proportion of children with no obvious decay since 2008. Further analysis is needed to understand the factors that have contributed to this welcome trend. This will help local authorities identify the steps they can take to extend the improvement in decay levels to all sectors of their populations.

 
Page 6 of 58